Even if your employer does find out about your bankruptcy, it is against the law for your employer to discriminate against an employee who has filed for bankruptcy. The U.S. Bankruptcy code, which is a federal law, specifically outlines many situations where discrimination against people who have filed for bankruptcy is prohibited.
A “341” meeting is a meeting required under Bankruptcy Code section 341. It is a meeting where the Trustee will put you under oath to answer questions about your petition and schedules. If the case is a Chapter 11 or Chapter 13, the questions will involve what the plan going forward will entail, and the meeting will be more in depth.
Bankruptcy gives you an opportunity to get a fresh financial start. Having a bankruptcy on your record can cause problems if you need to apply for loans, mortgages and other financing. Though the impact of bankruptcy on your credit report and credit score can last up to 10 years, you can improve your scores quicker if you are able to rebuild credit.
In most states, when filing for bankruptcy, the Debtor has no choice about exemptions. The only exemptions available to the individual in most other states will be the state exemptions. The bankruptcy code provides that state law may provide for debtors to have a choice of the federal exemptions or state exemptions in bankruptcy, and New Mexico has done so.
Most so-called credit counseling or debt consolidation companies cannot provide you with benefits that you get by negotiating with your creditors yourself or with an attorney. Even legitimate agencies won’t give you the same fresh start and legal protection that bankruptcy can.
One of the most important aspects of a divorce is for the court to determine how assets and debts are divided among spouses. New Mexico follows the “community property” legal system, which holds that all assets acquired during a marriage that are not considered separate property are community property and will be split during a divorce.
One of the most important aspects of a divorce is for the court to determine how assets and debts are divided among spouses. New Mexico follows the “community property” legal system, which holds that all assets acquired during a marriage that are not considered separate property are community property and will be split during a divorce.
Understanding the divorce procedure in New Mexico before you file can help reduce the stress and emotional turbulence divorce brings, and will likely help you save time and money. Let’s explore the divorce process from start to finish.
Deciding to get a divorce can be one of the most difficult decisions in your life. But once the decision has been made and the “petition for dissolution of marriage” has been filed, it’s important to organize and prepare yourself for the divorce process that lies ahead.
If you have been served with divorce papers, that means your spouse has filed a “Petition for the Dissolution of Marriage” and initiated the first step in the divorce process to legally dissolve your marriage in New Mexico. This can be an emotionally trying experience, especially if you weren’t expecting it.